Most Read Articles
12 days ago
Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.
4 days ago
At a recent lunch symposium during the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Malaysian Society of Hypertension, Dr Chow Yok Wai spoke on the importance of patient adherence in the management of hypertension, highlighting the role of combination therapy in improving treatment outcomes.
6 days ago
Myopia is associated with depressive symptoms in Chinese adults, a new population-based study shows.
7 days ago
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the 10th commonest cause of death in Singapore, with a disease burden of 5.9 percent according to a 2015 population-based survey (EPIC-Asia survey) in Singapore. Pearl Toh spoke with Dr Augustine Tee, chief and senior consultant of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Changi General Hospital (CGH) in Singapore, on how COPD is often underdetected in the primary care population as symptoms are not specific and diagnosis requires a combination of clinical risk factors, symptoms and spirometry testing.

Touchscreen use linked to sleep problems in infants and toddlers

13 days ago
Infants and toddlers who were exposed to touchscreens experience significantly poorer nighttime and daytime sleep as well as significant delays in sleep onset, according to UK-based researchers.

In the first study of its kind to be performed among such young children, the researchers investigated associations between frequency of touchscreen use and sleep patterns in infants and toddlers aged 6–36 months. Data were derived from 715 parental responses to an online survey regarding infant and toddler daily exposure to media such as TV and touchscreens as well as patterns of sleep (nighttime and daytime sleep duration, sleep onset, and frequency of sleep awakening). Structural equation models were used to adjust for age, gender, TV exposure, and maternal education.

Infants and toddlers with greater exposure to touchscreens were found to have significantly shorter nighttime sleep and significantly longer daytime sleep, as well as significant delays in sleep onset. Every additional hour of touchscreen use was associated with an overall reduction in sleep of 15.6 minutes. Only frequency of sleep awakening was not significantly affected by touchscreen use.

Exposure to TV and videogames has previously been linked to poorer sleep and developmental outcomes in older children, but the advent of portable touchscreen devices appears to have extended this effect downwards in age.

The researchers suggest that further longitudinal studies are required to clarify their findings as well as to determine possible mechanisms underlying the observed associations.
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Most Read Articles
12 days ago
Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.
4 days ago
At a recent lunch symposium during the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Malaysian Society of Hypertension, Dr Chow Yok Wai spoke on the importance of patient adherence in the management of hypertension, highlighting the role of combination therapy in improving treatment outcomes.
6 days ago
Myopia is associated with depressive symptoms in Chinese adults, a new population-based study shows.
7 days ago
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the 10th commonest cause of death in Singapore, with a disease burden of 5.9 percent according to a 2015 population-based survey (EPIC-Asia survey) in Singapore. Pearl Toh spoke with Dr Augustine Tee, chief and senior consultant of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Changi General Hospital (CGH) in Singapore, on how COPD is often underdetected in the primary care population as symptoms are not specific and diagnosis requires a combination of clinical risk factors, symptoms and spirometry testing.