Most Read Articles
6 days ago
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TNFR 1, 2 linked to all-cause, cardiovascular mortality in haemodialysis

2 months ago

The risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among end-stage renal disease patients receiving haemodialysis may be associated with increased levels of the circulating tumour necrosis factor receptors (TNFR), a new study reports.

The study included 319 patients undergoing haemodialysis. Only those who were clinically stable and with baseline serum data were included; those who had advanced dementia, were hospitalized two months prior or received haemodialysis for <1 month were excluded.

The primary outcomes were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These included mortalities from myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, stroke and congestive heart failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure TNFR 1, 2 and total TNF-α levels.

Of the participants, 60.8 percent were male and 50.2 percent had diabetes. After a median follow-up period of 53 months, 72.4 percent of the participants remained alive. Of those who died, 45.5 percent died because of cardiovascular diseases.

Univariate analysis showed that all-cause mortality was significantly associated with both TNFRs (TNFR1: hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95 percent CI, 1.58 to 3.70; p<0.0001; TNFR2: HR, 2.70; 1.77 to 4.13; p<0.0001) but not with TNF-α. This trend remained significant even after controlling for other variables like age, blood pressure and prior cardiovascular diseases (TNFR1: HR, 2.34; 1.50 to 3.64; p<0.0001; TNFR2: HR, 2.13; 1.38 to 3.29; p<0.0001).

Only TNFR1 showed significant association with cardiovascular mortality after controlling for variables (HR, 2.15; 1.13 to 4.10; p=0.02).

The findings thus show a correlation between all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and circulating TNFRs in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing haemodialysis.

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Most Read Articles
6 days ago
Obesity has a slight and substantial negative impact on the cognitive functioning of healthy individuals and major depressive disorder patients (MDD), respectively, a new study shows.
10 days ago
Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.
4 days ago
Myopia is associated with depressive symptoms in Chinese adults, a new population-based study shows.
4 days ago
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the 10th commonest cause of death in Singapore, with a disease burden of 5.9 percent according to a 2015 population-based survey (EPIC-Asia survey) in Singapore. Pearl Toh spoke with Dr Augustine Tee, chief and senior consultant of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Changi General Hospital (CGH) in Singapore, on how COPD is often underdetected in the primary care population as symptoms are not specific and diagnosis requires a combination of clinical risk factors, symptoms and spirometry testing.