Most Read Articles
Naomi Rodrig, 2 years ago

Curing leukemia is no longer a dream, especially for leukemia types related to a single known genetic defect, argued Dr. Pia Raanani, Head of Hematology Division at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.

Christina Lau, 2 years ago
Ultrasound screening should be routine for women with mammographically dense breasts, say researchers from Connecticut, the first US state to enact legislation mandating radiologists to inform women with dense breasts of the potential benefit of supplemental screening.
4 years ago

A radiotherapy (RT) technique that delivers much lower doses to the contralateral submandibular gland has been shown to reduce symptoms of dry month in patients with head and neck cancers.

Rajesh Kumar, 4 years ago

Older chemotherapy drugs that are no longer widely used due to their toxicity profiles are finding new uses in cancer treatment, thanks to the development of antibody-drug conjugates.

Teen cancers on the rise since 1975

4 months ago

Studies that seek to understand the causes of the spike in incidence of teen cancers is currently needed. Since 1975, there has been a 25-percent overall increase in teen cancers, particularly in testicular and thyroid cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma due to unknown, probably multifactorial reasons.

The study used data from the 2015 Cancer Statistics Review by the SEER programme in order to describe cancer trends among individuals between the ages of 15 and 19. This included trends of histologic cancer groups and sites of cancer.

The rates of change of the annual incidence of teen cancers from 1975 to 2012 were calculated using linear regression analysis.

Such analyses showed that since 1975, incidence rates of cancers in teens increased at least until 2012. Specifically, cumulative incidence at all sites showed an increase of 0.62 percent for females and 0.67 percent for males annually.

In other words, the incidence rates for males and females in 2012, compared to those in 1975, rose by 28 and 26 percent, respectively. Furthermore, of the 4,900 teen cancers diagnosed in the US in 2012, 1,000 cases can be accounted for by this increasing trend.

In females, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (2.16 percent), thyroid cancer (2.12 percent) and acute myeloid leukaemia (1.73 percent) showed the greatest annual increase. In males, these were thyroid cancer (1.59 percent), testicular cancer (1.55 percent) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (1.38 percent).

Further studies that explore the reasons behind this rise are needed in addressing this problem.

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Most Read Articles
Naomi Rodrig, 2 years ago

Curing leukemia is no longer a dream, especially for leukemia types related to a single known genetic defect, argued Dr. Pia Raanani, Head of Hematology Division at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.

Christina Lau, 2 years ago
Ultrasound screening should be routine for women with mammographically dense breasts, say researchers from Connecticut, the first US state to enact legislation mandating radiologists to inform women with dense breasts of the potential benefit of supplemental screening.
4 years ago

A radiotherapy (RT) technique that delivers much lower doses to the contralateral submandibular gland has been shown to reduce symptoms of dry month in patients with head and neck cancers.

Rajesh Kumar, 4 years ago

Older chemotherapy drugs that are no longer widely used due to their toxicity profiles are finding new uses in cancer treatment, thanks to the development of antibody-drug conjugates.