Most Read Articles
12 days ago
Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.
4 days ago
At a recent lunch symposium during the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Malaysian Society of Hypertension, Dr Chow Yok Wai spoke on the importance of patient adherence in the management of hypertension, highlighting the role of combination therapy in improving treatment outcomes.
6 days ago
Myopia is associated with depressive symptoms in Chinese adults, a new population-based study shows.
7 days ago
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the 10th commonest cause of death in Singapore, with a disease burden of 5.9 percent according to a 2015 population-based survey (EPIC-Asia survey) in Singapore. Pearl Toh spoke with Dr Augustine Tee, chief and senior consultant of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Changi General Hospital (CGH) in Singapore, on how COPD is often underdetected in the primary care population as symptoms are not specific and diagnosis requires a combination of clinical risk factors, symptoms and spirometry testing.

Patient-led, liberal resumption of physical activity improves outcomes following prolapse surgery

13 days ago
Women who liberally engage in activities such as heavy lifting, aerobics, running, and sit-ups once they feel capable of doing so may have improved pelvic floor outcomes compared with those who avoid such activities for 3 months after prolapse surgery, according to US-based researchers.

In their multicentre, double-blind trial, 95 women who underwent minimally invasive sacrocolpopexy (n=58), vaginal suspension (n=27), or vaginal closure (n=9) were randomized to liberal (n=45) or restricted (n=50) activity recommendations for 3 months following surgery. Liberal activity was defined as activity resumed at the woman’s own pace with no restrictions on lifting or high-impact activities such as running or sit-ups; and restricted activity was defined as the avoidance of heavy lifting and of strenuous activities such as aerobics. Patient satisfaction was assessed by questionnaire after 3 months and scored using a 5-point Likert scale. Secondary outcomes, including anatomic results such as pelvic organ prolapse quantification and pelvic floor outcomes such as urinary symptoms, were also assessed after 3 months.

At study end, patient satisfaction with postoperative outcomes was high in both groups (98 percent vs 94 percent among women in the liberal and restricted activity groups, respectively; odds ratio, 0.36, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.036–3.55; p=0.619).

In addition, most anatomic outcomes did not differ. However, fewer women in the liberal activity group reported pelvic floor symptoms.
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Most Read Articles
12 days ago
Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.
4 days ago
At a recent lunch symposium during the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Malaysian Society of Hypertension, Dr Chow Yok Wai spoke on the importance of patient adherence in the management of hypertension, highlighting the role of combination therapy in improving treatment outcomes.
6 days ago
Myopia is associated with depressive symptoms in Chinese adults, a new population-based study shows.
7 days ago
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the 10th commonest cause of death in Singapore, with a disease burden of 5.9 percent according to a 2015 population-based survey (EPIC-Asia survey) in Singapore. Pearl Toh spoke with Dr Augustine Tee, chief and senior consultant of the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine at Changi General Hospital (CGH) in Singapore, on how COPD is often underdetected in the primary care population as symptoms are not specific and diagnosis requires a combination of clinical risk factors, symptoms and spirometry testing.