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The launch of a new medication for treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is timely as more than 30 years has passed since the introduction of a new class of oral medication, says an urologist.

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Erectile dysfunction (ED), previously and less precisely called impotence, is the most common sexual problem in men1,2. ED is defined as the “inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance”3. A minimum period of three months of such inability is required to establish a definite diagnosis of ED, with the exception of known cases of trauma or surgically induced ED4,5. ED should be distinguished from other kinds of sexual dysfunctions such as loss of libido, premature ejaculation or anorgasmia, although some patients might also experience a combination of these disorders5. ED causes a significant impact on the quality of life, self-esteem, and mental wellbeing of men as well as on their interpersonal relationships6-8.

Obese men with low risk prostate cancer have higher risk for unfavourable disease

20 Jun 2017

Obesity is associated with greater risk for unfavourable pathological features in men with low risk prostate cancer who are eligible for active surveillance, according to a study. Obese men are likely to have transition zone cancer, which is related to unfavourable pathology findings in those with very low risk prostate cancer.

Researchers analysed the records of 890 patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer via multiscore (12 or more) biopsy to examine the impact of obesity on unfavourable disease in men with low risk prostate cancer eligible for active surveillance and to confirm the underlying association with tumour location.

The definition of ‘unfavourable disease’ was a primary Gleason pattern ≥4 or pathological stage ≥T3. Researchers performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify factors tied to unfavourable disease and evaluated the association of unfavourable disease with anatomical location of the index tumour.

According to established body mass index (BMI) cutoff points for Asian men, a total of 216 (24.3 percent) men had a BMI of <23 kg/m2 (normal), 544 (61.1 percent) had a BMI or 23 to 27.5 kg/m2 (overweight) and 130 men (14.6 percent) had a BMI of ≥27.5 kg/m2 (obese).

Based on multivariate analysis, age, prostate volume and BMI were independently associated with unfavourable disease irrespective of the various active surveillance criteria used. Obese patients, compared with normal weight participants, had a higher risk of unfavourable disease for those fulfilling the John Hopkins Hospital criteria.

Across all criteria for active surveillance, transition zone cancer showed more frequent unfavourable disease than nontransition zone cancer (p<0.01 for all). For the John Hopkins Hospital criteria, the proportion of transition zone cancer was 4.2, 11.6 and 16.7 percent for normal weight, overweight and obesity, respectively (p=0.022).

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 24 Mar 2016

Salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) after radiation produces good long-term survival rates in men with prostate adenocarcinoma, according to a recent study.

18 Mar 2017
Prior pregnancies appear to carry an increased risk of developing nephrolithiasis in women of reproductive age, a study suggests.
21 Jan 2016

The launch of a new medication for treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is timely as more than 30 years has passed since the introduction of a new class of oral medication, says an urologist.

01 Apr 2013

Erectile dysfunction (ED), previously and less precisely called impotence, is the most common sexual problem in men1,2. ED is defined as the “inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance”3. A minimum period of three months of such inability is required to establish a definite diagnosis of ED, with the exception of known cases of trauma or surgically induced ED4,5. ED should be distinguished from other kinds of sexual dysfunctions such as loss of libido, premature ejaculation or anorgasmia, although some patients might also experience a combination of these disorders5. ED causes a significant impact on the quality of life, self-esteem, and mental wellbeing of men as well as on their interpersonal relationships6-8.