Most Read Articles
01 Oct 2013

Heart disease is still New Zealand’s biggest killer, with one Kiwi dying from coronary heart disease every 90 minutes. Pharmacy Today New Zealand looks at how pharmacists can help

Dr. James Salisi, 01 Jul 2014

The recent spike in the number of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the Philippines means that clinicians and pharmacists alike may need to increase their awareness and competency in prescribing and monitoring HIV treatment. Although taught in medical and pharmacy schools, the scarcity in exposure to clinical cases before highlights the need to for physicians and pharmacist to review HIV pharmacotherapy in order to cater to the increasing HIV patient population.

01 Sep 2017
Complementary medicines can play an important part in maintaining wellness, preventing deficiencies and optimizing health outcomes, says Dr Lesley Braun PhD, Director of the Blackmores Institute. 
Audrey Abella, 16 Oct 2017
The use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may prevent repeat revascularization in patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for peripheral artery disease (PAD) compared with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), according to a presentation at APCH 2017.

Glucocorticoid, cyclophosphamide combo therapy delivers lower relapse in IgG4-RD

28 Jul 2017

Combination therapy of glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is more effective and has a lower relapse rate than glucocorticoid monotherapy for IgG4 related disease (IgG4-RD), a new study reveals.

The study included 102 IgG4-RD patients randomized to receive either corticosteroid monotherapy (n=52; median age 49.72 years) or in combination with CYC (n=50; median age 53.52 years). Exclusion criteria were serious infections, pregnancy, active hepatitis and serious cardiac insufficiency.

Over a follow-up period of 1 year, relapse rate was significantly higher in the monotherapy group (n=20; 38.5 percent) than in the combination therapy group (n=6; 12.0 percent).

Five patients in the monotherapy group relapsed at 3 months, nine at 6 months and the remaining six at 12 months. In contrast, in the combination therapy group, one patient relapsed at 6 months, and the remaining five at 12 months.

Mean time to flare was significantly greater in the combination therapy group (11.0±2.45 months) than in the monotherapy group (7.05±3.55 months; p=0.018).

In the monotherapy group, 31 patients showed a good response; 13 of which had complete response while 18 had partial response. The 20 patients that relapsed were administered additional immunosuppressive agents which subsequently resulted in a good response.

There were 44 patients who showed no flares in the combination therapy group; 16 of which showed complete response while the remaining 28 had partial response. Of the six patients who relapsed, pancreatitis swelling was observed in one. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was delivered and improved the organ recurrence.

Rate of disease remission was 59.6 percent (n=31) in the monotherapy group and 88.0 percent (n=44) in the combination therapy group.

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Most Read Articles
01 Oct 2013

Heart disease is still New Zealand’s biggest killer, with one Kiwi dying from coronary heart disease every 90 minutes. Pharmacy Today New Zealand looks at how pharmacists can help

Dr. James Salisi, 01 Jul 2014

The recent spike in the number of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the Philippines means that clinicians and pharmacists alike may need to increase their awareness and competency in prescribing and monitoring HIV treatment. Although taught in medical and pharmacy schools, the scarcity in exposure to clinical cases before highlights the need to for physicians and pharmacist to review HIV pharmacotherapy in order to cater to the increasing HIV patient population.

01 Sep 2017
Complementary medicines can play an important part in maintaining wellness, preventing deficiencies and optimizing health outcomes, says Dr Lesley Braun PhD, Director of the Blackmores Institute. 
Audrey Abella, 16 Oct 2017
The use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may prevent repeat revascularization in patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for peripheral artery disease (PAD) compared with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), according to a presentation at APCH 2017.