Most Read Articles
2 years ago
A study on participants from the Women's Health Initiative showed the dissociation between calcium/vitamin D supplementation and reduction in menopausal symptoms.
one year ago
Dr Lesley Braun, Blackmores Institute Director, is interviewed and answers some critical questions on complementary medicine, its evolution, its benefits and its present and future roles alongside mainstream medicine.
Pearl Toh, 12 days ago
Elderly persons (≥75 years) on aspirin-based antiplatelet therapy without routine proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use have a higher long-term risk of major bleeding, in particular upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding which is often more disabling or fatal than in younger persons, according to the OXVASC* study.
Pearl Toh, 2 months ago
Celecoxib is preferred over naproxen when added to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) for preventing recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in patients at high risk of both GI and cardiovascular (CV) events, who require concomitant aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to the CONCERN* study.

D-cycloserine may have insignificant benefits to OCD, AD

4 months ago
One in three Malaysians suffer from mental health problems

D-cycloserine (DCS), used to augment behaviour therapy in patients with obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and anxiety disorders (AD), may have very little to almost no effect, a new meta-analysis reveals.

Web of Science, PubMed, PsychArticles, Psyndex and PsycInfo were accessed for this meta-analysis. Only randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded studies that examined the effect of DCS interventions on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on human patients with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders were included.

The methodological qualities and risk of bias of the studies selected were evaluated using a self-developed scale based on the method of the Cochrane Collaboration.

The search resulted in 23 studies corresponding to a cumulative sample size of 1,314 patients (659 received DCS, 655 were controls). The mean quality score of the studies was 8.4 (range, 6.5 to 10).

The Hedge’s g estimates, which do not take into account pretreatment values, showed that DCS had no effect on CBT for mid-treatment (g, -0.12; 95 percent CI, -0.28 to 0.07; p=0.14) and only a small effect post-treatment (g, -0.12; -0.47 to -0.08; p<0.01).

On the other hand, the standardized mean change score (SMCC), which controls for the pretreatment values, showed that DCS had no significant effect during mid-treatment (SMCC, -0.05; -0.26 to 0.15; p=0.31), post-treatment (SMCC, -0.10; -0.29 to 0.07; p=0.13) and a 1-month follow-up (SMCC, -0.18; -0.46 to 0.10; p=0.10).

Despite previous meta-analyses finding DCS to yield moderate improvements, the most recent studies indicate that this may actually be insignificant. Primary studies of higher quality are needed to avoid overestimation of the benefits and effects of such interventions.

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Most Read Articles
2 years ago
A study on participants from the Women's Health Initiative showed the dissociation between calcium/vitamin D supplementation and reduction in menopausal symptoms.
one year ago
Dr Lesley Braun, Blackmores Institute Director, is interviewed and answers some critical questions on complementary medicine, its evolution, its benefits and its present and future roles alongside mainstream medicine.
Pearl Toh, 12 days ago
Elderly persons (≥75 years) on aspirin-based antiplatelet therapy without routine proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use have a higher long-term risk of major bleeding, in particular upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding which is often more disabling or fatal than in younger persons, according to the OXVASC* study.
Pearl Toh, 2 months ago
Celecoxib is preferred over naproxen when added to proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) for preventing recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in patients at high risk of both GI and cardiovascular (CV) events, who require concomitant aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to the CONCERN* study.