Most Read Articles
2 years ago
The treatment armamentarium of atopic dermatitis (AD) includes pharmaceuticals like emollients, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors. Recently available, medical devices are a newer class of topical, non-steroidal, semi-solid formulation for the treatment of AD and touted to possess emollient, anti-inflammatory, and anti-pruritic properties. To determine the role of medical devices in flare and remission management in AD, a panel of local experts from the field of dermatology, paediatric dermatology, and allergy convened to review the available evidence and highlights of the meeting are reported here.
2 years ago
Hair loss is a common problem for both men and women. Despite the various treatments available, hair loss remains a difficult condition to treat in most people. To gain better insights into the science behind hair loss, an interview was conducted recently with Dr Jia-Wei Liu, member of the European Hair Research Society and Vice President of Research and Development at Legacy Healthcare, Switzerland. The interview focused on hair loss and its management with CG 210TM, a novel botanical hair and scalp essence. 
5 days ago
There is a marked difference in the thickness of the granular layer between palmar psoriasis and hand eczema, and this may be helpful in differentiating between the two skin conditions, according to a recent study.
Jan Welch, 6 years ago

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common, with rates of many infections increas­ing over the last two decades.1 Community screening studies in the UK have shown a prevalence of about 10% for chlamydial infection2 and (among women screened in an urban setting) 3% for gonorrhoea.3 In women (Figure 1), these potentially serious infections are often asymptomatic, whereas the presence of symptoms such as vaginal discharge generally indicates a less pathogenic (but still potentially debilitating) infection, with an organism such as Candida. STIs are often multiple, and the finding of one infection should prompt consider­ation of testing for others. Many sexual health services now initially provide screening tests for asymptomatic women, but a more comprehensive assessment—comprising detailed history4 and genital examination5—is usually necessary when symptoms are present.

CXCL-9, CXCL-10, CXCL-10, IFN-γ elevated in adult-onset Still’s disease

2 months ago

Increased serum levels of C-X-C motif chemokine (CXCL)-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ are associated with clinical manifestations of adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD), reports a new study.

The study included 39 patients with untreated AOSD, 30 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 28 healthy controls. Those with autoimmune, neoplastic and infectious disorders were excluded. Baseline demographic information, clinical characteristics, AOSD activity and laboratory findings were recorded.

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure serum levels of CXCL-11, CXCL-9, CXCL-10, IFN-β, IFN-α and IFN-γ. Skin biopsies from 34 AOSD patients were subjected to histopathological analysis to determine disease activity.

Among the three groups, there were no significant differences in gender or age. The most common symptoms of AOSD were high spiking fevers (94.9 percent) followed by skin rashes (87.2 percent), arthritis (53.8 percent), sore throat (56.4 percent) and splenomegaly (20.5 percent). At baseline, all AOSD patients had high levels of disease activity.

AOSD patients had significantly higher levels of IFN-γ (50.5±34.4 pg/mL) compared with RA patients (27.7±21.4 pg/mL; p=0.001) and healthy controls (23.7±11.1 pg/mL; p<0.001). Similarly, CXCL-9 (595.6±790.8 pg/mL) and CXCL-10 (229.5±188.1 pg/mL) levels were significantly higher in AOSD patients than in RA patients (p<0.001 for both) and healthy controls (p<0.001 for both).

Further analysis showed that levels of CXCL-9 (p=0.004), CXCL-10 (p=0.003) and CXCL-11 (p=0.017) were significantly greater in AOSD patients with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome (RHS) than those without. IFN-γ levels were not significantly different between the two groups.

Finally, in follow-up samples collected 8.1±6 months after initial collections, mean levels of CXCL-9, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 decreased significantly compared with initial samples. The level of IFN-γ did not change significantly.

Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
2 years ago
The treatment armamentarium of atopic dermatitis (AD) includes pharmaceuticals like emollients, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors. Recently available, medical devices are a newer class of topical, non-steroidal, semi-solid formulation for the treatment of AD and touted to possess emollient, anti-inflammatory, and anti-pruritic properties. To determine the role of medical devices in flare and remission management in AD, a panel of local experts from the field of dermatology, paediatric dermatology, and allergy convened to review the available evidence and highlights of the meeting are reported here.
2 years ago
Hair loss is a common problem for both men and women. Despite the various treatments available, hair loss remains a difficult condition to treat in most people. To gain better insights into the science behind hair loss, an interview was conducted recently with Dr Jia-Wei Liu, member of the European Hair Research Society and Vice President of Research and Development at Legacy Healthcare, Switzerland. The interview focused on hair loss and its management with CG 210TM, a novel botanical hair and scalp essence. 
5 days ago
There is a marked difference in the thickness of the granular layer between palmar psoriasis and hand eczema, and this may be helpful in differentiating between the two skin conditions, according to a recent study.
Jan Welch, 6 years ago

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common, with rates of many infections increas­ing over the last two decades.1 Community screening studies in the UK have shown a prevalence of about 10% for chlamydial infection2 and (among women screened in an urban setting) 3% for gonorrhoea.3 In women (Figure 1), these potentially serious infections are often asymptomatic, whereas the presence of symptoms such as vaginal discharge generally indicates a less pathogenic (but still potentially debilitating) infection, with an organism such as Candida. STIs are often multiple, and the finding of one infection should prompt consider­ation of testing for others. Many sexual health services now initially provide screening tests for asymptomatic women, but a more comprehensive assessment—comprising detailed history4 and genital examination5—is usually necessary when symptoms are present.