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Combined variables potentially outperform OSTA in predicting spinal osteoporosis in Asian women

Roshini Claire Anthony
6 months ago

The combination of age, weight, menopausal status, chronic joint pain, and right handgrip strength is a good tool to predict spinal osteoporosis in midlife Asian women, and may be an improvement over the Osteoporosis Self-assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA), according to a study presented at the 6th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting (IOF Regionals 2016) held recently in Singapore.

Multivariate analysis demonstrated that age (p<0.05), menopausal status (p<0.05), chronic joint pain (p<0.01), weight (p<0.001), and right handgrip strength (p<0.01) were independently associated with spinal osteoporosis (T score ≤-2.5 standard deviation [SD]). [IOF Regionals 2016, abstract OC16]

Combining these variables demonstrated an area under the curve (AUC) value of 84 percent, while OSTA had an AUC of 79 percent.

“At the moment there is no optimal screening tool that is available to identify osteoporosis,” said Dr Susan Logan from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the National University Hospital in Singapore, who presented the findings. “Combining these variables may outperform OSTA in predicting spinal osteoporosis in midlife Singaporean women.”

The aim of the study was to identify variables that were significantly associated with spinal low bone mineral density and to use them to create a tool that would help screen for osteoporosis in midlife women. The efficacy of this tool was then compared with OSTA, considered the gold standard in screening for osteoporosis in Asian women.

Study participants were 512 women aged 45–69 years who attended gynaecology clinics for well-woman checks and noncancer-related gynaecological symptoms between 2014 and 2015. Most women (80 percent) were married and parous (96 percent), and spinal osteoporosis was detected in 6.8 percent (n=35) of the participants. The multifaceted assessment included testing for fasting blood glucose levels, physical assessment, questionnaires, and a full-body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan.

More than 280 variables were collected including sociodemographic features, physical assessments (eg, Short Physical Performance Battery, blood pressure, height, weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumference), and questionnaires that validated symptoms and medical history (eg, Menopause Rating Scale, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Global Physical Activity Questionnaire).

The high number of variables collected and the use of validated questionnaires were among the study strengths, while the small sample size and self-reporting of variables presented limitations.

According to Logan, bone loss in the spine appears to precede that of the hip in women and may be a better location for identifying younger women at risk of osteoporosis. 

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Most Read Articles
3 years ago

Over the past few decades, there has been widespread concern about the increasing proportion of births born by caesarean delivery. The rising rate of primary caesarean section has led to the increased number of obstetric population with a history of prior caesarean delivery. Although this group of women may be offered planned vaginal birth after previous caesarean section (VBAC) or elective repeat caesarean section (ERCS), the VBAC rate is generally low particularly in well-developed countries. In the United States, the VBAC rate has decreased to 8.5% by 2006, while the total caesarean rate has increased to 31.1%.1

one year ago
Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) are not risk factors for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, according to the women’s health initiative.
Lianne Cowie, 3 years ago

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are commonly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the effects of these agents on pregnancy outcomes remain unclear. Now, a systematic review of the English literature has indicated that they pose little risk to the mother or her infant, even if use is continued through the third trimester.

one year ago
A study on participants from the Women's Health Initiative showed the dissociation between calcium/vitamin D supplementation and reduction in menopausal symptoms.