Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 05 Oct 2017

Olfactory impairment in older adults may point to an elevated risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), particularly in Caucasian men, a small US study found.

07 Oct 2017
Women who follow a low-fat dietary pattern appear to have reduced breast cancer mortality, according to data from the Earlier Women’s Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
Women with higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were less likely to have poor sleep quality during pregnancy, especially among those with anxiety symptoms, according to the GUSTO* study.
6 days ago
Blood glucose testing every other day in patients with controlled gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) resulted in higher testing compliance than every day testing, a new study has shown.

Coffee intake not linked to elevated risk of incident erectile dysfunction

21 Sep 2017

Long-term coffee intake does not contribute to an increased risk of erectile dysfunction, a recent prospective study suggests.

The study included 21,403 men aged 40 to 75 years. Total coffee, regular and decaffeinated coffee intakes were self-reported through food frequency questionnaires. A questionnaire was also used to evaluate ED at different time points (2000, 2004 and 2008).

Of the men, 7,298 developed ED. Multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models showed no difference in the risk of developing incident ED between the highest and the lowest intake categories (≥4 vs 0 cups/day) of total (hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95 percent CI, 0.90 to 1.11) and regular coffee intakes (HR, 1.00; 0.89 to 1.13).

In terms of decaffeinated coffee intake, the highest intake category increased the risk of incident ED by 37 percent (1.08 to 1.73; p=0.005 for trend) compared with the lowest intake category. Stratified analyses demonstrated this association among current smokers (p=0.005 for trend).

The current findings are different from that of a US study reporting reduced odds of prevalent ED with caffeine intake, especially an intake equivalent to approximately two to three daily cups of coffee (170 to 375 mg/day). This protective association was observed among overweight/obese and hypertensive men, but not among diabetic men. [PLoS One 2015;10:e0123547]

The inverse association between caffeine intake and ED has been attributed to a caffeine-triggered series of pharmacological effects that result in the relaxation of the penile helicine arteries and the cavernous smooth muscle that lines cavernosal spaces, thus increasing penile blood flow. [Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 2004;31:82–85]

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 05 Oct 2017

Olfactory impairment in older adults may point to an elevated risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), particularly in Caucasian men, a small US study found.

07 Oct 2017
Women who follow a low-fat dietary pattern appear to have reduced breast cancer mortality, according to data from the Earlier Women’s Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
Women with higher plasma tryptophan concentrations were less likely to have poor sleep quality during pregnancy, especially among those with anxiety symptoms, according to the GUSTO* study.
6 days ago
Blood glucose testing every other day in patients with controlled gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) resulted in higher testing compliance than every day testing, a new study has shown.