gonorrhea%20-%20uncomplicated%20anogenital%20infection
GONORRHEA - UNCOMPLICATED ANOGENITAL INFECTION
Gonorrhea is a sexually or vertically transmitted infection secondary to gram-negative diplococcus Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
It is one of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections that may cause pelvic inflammatory disease leading to infertility or ectopic pregnancy.
Most of the infected females are asymptomatic but may present with increased or altered vaginal discharge, dysuria, urethral discharge, abnormal vaginal bleeding, vulval itching or burning, dyspareunia, conjunctivitis and proctitis.

Introduction

  •  It is one of the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections that may cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) leading to infertility or ectopic pregnancy

Definition

  • Gonorrhea is a sexually or vertically transmitted infection secondary to gram-negative diplococcus Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Signs and Symptoms

  • Most of the infected females are asymptomatic, but may present with:
    • Increased or altered vaginal discharge - most common
    • Dysuria
    • Urethral discharge
    • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
    • Vulval itching or burning
    • Dyspareunia
    • Conjunctivitis
    • Proctitis

Risk Factors

  • <25 years old
  • Unmarried
  • History of previous or concurrent sexually transmitted infection (STI)
  • New or >1 sex partner in the last 3 months
  • Sex partner currently has an STI
  • Sex partner with concurrent partners 
  • Inconsistent use of condom
  • Street involvement (youth on the streets, sex workers)
  • Injection drug use
  • Commercial sex worker
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