Respirology

Aspergillosis
Aspergillosis encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes depending on host immunity factors.
It is caused by Aspergillus, an ubiquitous, soil-dwelling, filamentous fungus that grows on soil, food, dead leaves, household dust, etc. It grows best at 37ºC and the small spores are easily inhaled and deposited deep in the lungs.
The most common pathogens are Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger and A. terreus.
Aspergilloma is a conglomeration of intertwined Aspergillus hyphae, fibrin, mucus and cellular debris within a pulmonary cavity or an ectatic bronchus.
Asthma
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in the lungs of children and adults.
The patient usually complains of shortness of breath, chest tightness and coughing with wheezing.
Goals of treatment are effective symptom control with minimal or no exacerbations, minimal or no nocturnal and daytime symptoms, no limitations on activities, minimal or no need for reliever treatment, and minimal adverse effects of medication.
Bronchiectasis
Bronchiectasis is an irreversible pathologic dilatation or ectasia of the bronchi due to repeated airway infection and inflammation.
It enhances susceptibility to bronchial infection and increases inflammatory reaction which causes further lung damage.
Classic symptoms of of bronchiectasis are cough with chronic sputum production along with recurring infective exacerbations and hemoptysis.
Bronchitis - Chronic in Acute Exacerbation

Chronic bronchitis is an infection of the trachea and bronchi for at least 3 consecutive months for more than 2 consecutive years.
The patient experiences symptoms of increase in dyspnea, sputum volume and sputum purulence over baseline on most days.

Diagnosis is basically based on clinical presentation.

Bronchitis - Uncomplicated Acute
Uncomplicated acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infection of the trachea and bronchi that usually lasts for 1 to 3 weeks. A healthy patient experiences sudden onset of cough, with or without sputum production.
An inflammatory response to infections of the bronchial epithelium of the large airways of the lungs that begins with mucosal injury, epithelial cell damage and release of proinflammatory mediators.
Transient airflow obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
Purulence can result from either bacterial or viral infection.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory respiratory disease characterized by reversible airflow limitation.

The patient usually have chronic cough, sputum production or dyspnea with or without history of risk factors for the disease.

The chronic airflow limitation is caused by a combination of small airways disease and parenchymal destruction.

It is a preventable & treatable disease.

Croup
Croup is a viral infection that causes erythema and edema of the tracheal walls and narrowing of the subglottic region. It is often characterized by an acute, rapidly progressing respiratory disease.
It is a medical emergency in children and requiring immediate treatment.
Most common causes are parainfluenza virus 1&2 and respiratory syncytial virus.
Occurrence of symptoms is usually at night and with abrupt onset and improve during daytime.
Influenza
The clinical spectrum of influenza ranges from asymptomatic infection to primary viral pneumonia that may progress to death.
Patients presenting with influenza-like illness (ie temperature of 37.8ºC, cough and/or sore throat and absence of a known cause other than influenza) might be infected with different types of influenza virus [eg avian influenza (H5N1)] as well as other respiratory pathogens.
A high index of suspicion is needed to recognize influenza in hospitalized patients.
Pneumonia is the most common complication of influenza virus.
Lung Cancer
Lung cancer is having a malignant tumor in the lungs especially in the cells lining air passages.
Primary tumor-related signs and symptoms are cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and chest discomfort.
Signs and symptoms due to intrathoracic spread may involve the nerves (hoarseness, dyspnea, muscle wasting of upper limb, Horner's syndrome), chest wall and pleura (chest pain, dyspnea) and vascular structures (facial swelling, dilated neck veins, cardiac tamponade) & viscera (dsyphagia).
The signs and symptoms due to metastatic spread are bone pain with or without pleuritic pain, neurologic symptoms, limb weakness, unsteady gait, cervical lymphadenopathy, and skin nodules.
Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease
Nontuberculous mycobacteria are ubiquitous and are usually found in soil, natural and treated water sources. They are relatively uncommon cause of pulmonary disease and likely to cause disseminated disease.
May cause both asymptomatic infection and symptomatic disease in humans.
There is no evidence of animal-to-human or human-to-human transmission in immunocompetent hosts.
Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease is a generally slowly progressive infection.
Signs and symptoms are generally nonspecific.
Panbronchiolitis - Diffuse
Diffuse panbronchiolitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the respiratory bronchioles.
It causes progressive suppurative and obstructive respiratory disease.
This is an idiopathic disease which is primarily found in Japan, Korea and China.
Predisposition to the disease may be genetically-related but environmental factors should also be considered.
Failure to treat diffuse panbronchiolitis can lead to development of bronchiectasis, progressive failure and death.
Pneumonia - Community-Acquired
Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) is an acute infection of the pulmonary parenchyma accompanied by symptoms of acute illness and abnormal chest findings.
It is a lower respiratory tract infection acquired in the community within 24 hours to <2 weeks or occurring ≤48 hours of hospital admission in patients who do not meet the criteria for healthcare-associated pneumonia.
It occurs at the highest rates in the very young and the very old.
Potentially life-threatening especially in older adults and those with comorbid disease.
Pneumonia - Hospital-Acquired
Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is defined as pneumonia occurring ≥48 hours after admission and excluding any infection that is incubating at the time of admission.
Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is described as pneumonia occurring >48-72 hours after endotracheal intubation and within 48 hours after removal of endotracheal tube.
Early-onset HAP or VAP is the pneumonia occurring within the first 4 days of hospitalization that may be cause by antibiotic-sensitive bacteria that usually carries a better diagnosis.
Late-onset HAP or VAP is the pneumonia occurring after ≥5 days. It is likely caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens associated with increased mortality and morbidity.
Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a syndrome resulting from restricted flow through the pulmonary arterial circulation resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and ultimately leading to right heart failure.
It is a part of the spectrum of pulmonary hypertension, which is hemodynamic and pathophysiological condition defined as an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg at rest.
Typical symptoms include progressive dyspnea on exertion, palpitations, fatigue, weakness, angina, syncope and abdominal distention.
Pulmonary Thromboembolism
Pulmonary embolism is the blockage of the blood vessels in the lungs usually due to blood clots from the veins, especially the veins in the legs and pelvis.
Dyspnea, chest pain, syncope or tachypnea (respiratory rate of ≥20/min) occur in most cases of pulmonary embolism.
Pleuritic chest pain with or without dyspnea is one of the most frequent presentations of this disease.
Syncope or shock are the hallmark signs of central pulmonary embolism and usually result in severe hemodynamic repercussions.
Signs of hemodynamic compromise and reduced heart flow are also usually present.
Rhinitis - Allergic
Allergic rhinitis is a symptomatic disorder of the nose secondary to IgE-mediated inflammation of the nasal membranes induced after exposure to allergens.
Major symptoms include nasal itching, watery rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction/congestion, sneezing and postnasal drainage.
Other symptoms include headache, conjunctival symptoms, eye pruritus, impaired smell and morning cough.
Symptoms can reverse spontaneous w/ or w/o treatment.
Rhinitis - Nonallergic
Nonallergic rhinitis is the inflammation of the nasal lining membranes without any immunoglobulin E mediation, as documented by allergen skin testing.
Major signs and symptoms include nasal itching, watery rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction/congestion, sneezing and postnasal drainage.
Symptoms can reverse spontaneously with or without treatment.
Rhinosinusitis - Acute, Bacterial
Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis is the mucosal inflammation of the nose and paransal sinuses caused by bacteria lasting >10 days for up to 4 weeks or symptoms worsening for 5-7 days within 10 days.
It is often preceded by a viral upper respiratory tract infection.
Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and typically difficult to differentiate from viral upper respiratory tract infection.
There is fever with nasal obstruction/congestion or anterior and/or posterior purulent drainage, with or without facial pressure/pain/fullness and reduction/loss of smell.
Streptococcus pneumoniae and unencapsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae cause half of acute rhinosinusitis cases.
Sarcoidosis - Pulmonary
Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease which may present with non-specific symptoms or symptoms related to organ-specific involvement.
Non-specific symptoms include fever, malaise, fatigue and weight loss.
Pulmonary involvement is seen in >90% of sarcoidosis patients.
Smoking Cessation
Ask, Advise to quit and Assess are the steps in approaching patients regarding smoking cessation.
All patients should be asked if they use tobacco and should have their tobacco status documented on a regular basis.
Patient with nicotine dependence is characterized by smoking within 30 minutes of waking, consuming >10 cigarettes/day and had withdrawal symptoms in previous attempts of quitting smoking.
Smokers should be strongly urged to quit at every physician encounter. Studies have shown that unplanned efforts to quit is as successful as planned attempts, stressing the benefits in encouraging smokers to quit smoking whenever opportunity arises.
Advice should be clear, personalized, supportive and non-judgmental.
Determine the willingness of smoker to make a quit attempt.
Patient is in action stage when he already stopped smoking within the last 6 months.
Tonsillopharyngitis - Acute
Patients with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis have classic symptoms of tonsillar swelling/exudates, tender anterior cervical lymphadenopathy, with no cough but with fever of >38ºC.
Clinical features suggestive of a viral etiology are conjunctivitis, absence of fever, coryza, cough, diarrhea, anterior stomatitis, hoarseness, discrete ulcerative lesions, rhinorrhea and viral exanthem and/or enanthem.
Antibiotics will not be needed for every patient that presents with sore throat but it should not be withheld if the clinical condition is severe or group A beta-hemolytic streptococca is suspected.
Tuberculosis - Pulmonary
Tuberculosis (TB) suspect is any one who has signs or symptoms suggestive of TB (eg >2 weeks productive cough).
Definite TB is considered in patients with culture or molecular line probe assay positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or in patients with at least 1 sputum smear positive for acid-fast bacilli.
TB cases are also classified based on the disease anatomical site, bacteriological results (including drug resistance), previous treatment history and patient's HIV status.
Pulmonary TB is a case of TB that involves the lung parenchyma.
Miliary TB is considered as PTB since lung lesions are also seen.
TB in the pleural effusion, mediastinal and/or hilar lymph nodes with no evidence of abnormalities in the chest x-ray are considered extrapulmonary TB.
Patients presenting with both PTB and extrapulmonary TB are classified as a case of PTB.