Oncology

Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is a heterogenous neoplasm that ranges from non-life-threatening, low-grade, superficial papillary lesions to high-grade invasive tumors that often metastasizes at the presentation.

It is the most common cancer involving the urinary system and it is the 11th most commonly diagnosed in the world.

Microscopic or gross painless hematuria is the most common presenting complaint.

Breast Cancer
Breast cancer is the presence of malignant breast nodule, mass or abscess.
Most common symptom of breast cancer is a new lump or mass in the breast. The lump or mass is usually painless, hard & irregular but it can also be tender, soft, rounded or painful.
Other signs & symptoms include breast pain or nipple pain, nipple discharge, nipple retraction and presence of breast skin changes (eg peau d' orange, nipple excoriation, scaling, inflammation, skin tethering, ulceration, abscess).
Cancer Pain
Cancer pain is an unpleasant sensory & emotional experience due to actual or potential tissue damage in patients with cancer.
Effective pain management in cancer patients with pain is an essential part of oncologic management due to increasing evidence of survival.
Pancreatic, head & neck cancer has a high prevalence of cancer pain.
During initial evaluation, follow-ups and new therapy initiation of patients with cancer, it is essential that they will be screened & evaluated for pain.
Cervical Cancer - Prevention & Screening
Mortality due to cervical cancer can be reduced by prevention, early detection & treatment.
Vaccination may be started as early as 9 years old.
Vaccination may reduce the incidence of HPV-related disease.
Screening for cervical cancer after vaccination is still recommended because only 70% of the virus types associated w/ invasive cervical cancer consist of HPV 16 & 18 types & women may not be entirely protected if they have been infected w/ other HPV types prior to vaccination.
Cervical Cancer - Treatment
Patients w/ abnormal Pap smear are referred for colonoscopy to screen for presence of cervical cancer.
Colposcopic exam should include inspection of the transformation zone, definition of the extent of the lesion & biopsy of the most abnormal area for tissue diagnosis.
The earliest stages of cervical carcinoma are generally asymptomatic.
Watery vaginal discharge & postcoital bleeding or intermittent spotting may be present & are usually unrecognized by the patient.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a malignant, chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by proliferation and accumulation of monoclonal B-cells in the bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph nodes, liver and spleen.

It is the most common form of adult leukemia in the Western world but rare in Asians.

Exact etiology is unknown but usually associated with genetic aberrations and lesions.

 

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a malignant myeloid disorder characterized by the presence of a distinctive cytogenetic abnormality known as the Philadelphia chromosome.

Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only known risk factor with median presentation at age >50 years old.

Three phases of the disorder are chronic, accelerated and blast.

Choice of therapy is influenced by age, availability of a donor, comorbidities and phase of CML.

Colorectal Cancer
Colorectal cancer is a carcinoma arising from the luminal surface of the colon.
It is the 2nd most common cancer in women and third most common cancer in male worldwide. It commonly arises from adenomatous polyps.
It is strongly linked to age with 83% occurring in people ≥60 years old.
Rectal cancer is defined as cancerous lesions located within 12 cm of the anal verge.
Febrile Neutropenia
Febrile neutropenia is having a fever of ≥38.3 ºC or ≥38 ºC over an hour and neutropenia that is having an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of <500 neutrophils/mm3 or an ANC <1000 neutrophils/mm3 expected to decline to ≤500 neutrophils/mm3 over the next 48 hours.
The risk of febrile neutropenia is directly proportional to the duration and severity of neutropenia.
Fever is frequently the only indication of infection in the neutropenic patient.
Gastric Cancer
Gastric cancer is the cancer originating in the esophagus, esophagogastric junction and stomach.
Most of gastric cancers are adenocarcinomas, subdivided according to histological appearances into diffuse (undifferentiated) and intestinal (well differentiated) types.
It is the 4th most common cancer and the 2nd most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.
Most common sites of gastric cancer are the proximal lesser curvature, cardia and esophagogastric junction.
Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are morphologically spindle cell, epithelioid, or occasionally pleomorphic mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.
Signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal tumor include presence of abdominal mass (which may be an incidental finding in endoscopy), gastrointestinal bleeding, hemoperitoneum, anemia and gastrointestinal perforation.
Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Hodgkin's lymphoma is a malignancy that arises from germinal center B cell.

Histologically, there is a presence of multinucleated giant cells in a mixed inflammatory background.

It is also known as Hodgkin's disease, Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin disease.

It commonly affects individuals ages 15-30 years old and those 55 years old and above.

The key morphologic characteristics include presence of Reed-Sternberg cells and lymphocyte-predominant cells.

Lung Cancer
Lung cancer is having a malignant tumor in the lungs especially in the cells lining air passages.
Primary tumor-related signs and symptoms are cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and chest discomfort.
Signs and symptoms due to intrathoracic spread may involve the nerves (hoarseness, dyspnea, muscle wasting of upper limb, Horner's syndrome), chest wall and pleura (chest pain, dyspnea) and vascular structures (facial swelling, dilated neck veins, cardiac tamponade) & viscera (dsyphagia).
The signs and symptoms due to metastatic spread are bone pain with or without pleuritic pain, neurologic symptoms, limb weakness, unsteady gait, cervical lymphadenopathy, and skin nodules.
Melanoma
Melanoma is a skin neoplasm that originates from malignant transformation of melanocytes.
It commonly occurs in the extremities of women and on trunk or head and neck in men.
Metastases are via lymphatic and hematogenous routes.
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Neuroendocrine tumors are rare, small, slow-growing epithelial neoplasms with predominant neuroendocrine differentiation found in most organs of the body.
They arise from cells throughout the diffuse endocrine system.
Carcinoid tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are the most common.
Carcinoid tumors arise from the lungs & bronchi, stomach, small intestine, appendix, rectum or thymus.
Majority of the neuroendocrine tumors are sporadic but some tumors are caused by inherited genetic syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia, Von-Hippel Lindau disease, tuberous sclerosis complex and neurofibromatosis.
They have the ability to store and secrete various peptides and neuroamines.
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative malignancies.
It is the most common hematologic cancer.
The most common subtypes are the diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma. The subtypes are based on the malignant cell's morphology, genetic features, immunohistological characteristics, and stage of maturation.

Ovarian Cancer
Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the ovaries.
It is the 7th most common cancer in women (excluding skin cancer) and the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer in developed countries.
The 3 histologic types of ovarian cancer are epithelial (primarily seen in women >50 years of age), germ cell (most commonly seen in women <20 years of age) and sex cord stromal (rare and produces steroid hormones).
The median age at the time of diagnosis is 63 years old and >70% present with advanced disease.

    Ovarian Mass
    Ovarian cysts are typically noted after clinical screening, or as a result of exam for a suspected pelvic mass, or an incidental finding in investigations done for other reasons.
    Most ovarian masses manifest with few or mild nonspecific symptoms.
    Ovarian masses in women of reproductive age are mostly benign but the risk of malignancy increases with age.
    Ovarian cysts in the prepubertal patients especially after the first week of life are abnormal and likely to be neoplastic. In adolescent patients, majority of ovarian masses are functional cysts.
    Pancreatic Cancer
    Pancreatic cancer is malignancy arising from the pancreas.
    It is the 13th most common cancer in the world, 10th most common in the United States, and 4th leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United Stated and Europe.
    Exocrine tumors account for 95% of malignant pancreatic disease.
    It is more common in women.
    The median age of occurrence is at 71 years old.
    Penile Cancer

    Penile cancer is a rare type of malignant growth that occurs on the skin or tissues of the penis.

    It often presents as a palpable visible penile lesion w/ signs that may include pain, bleeding, discharge or a foul odor.

    The lesion may be fungating, nodular or ulcerative and may be concealed by phimosis.


    Prostate Cancer

    Prostate cancer is the cancer that occurs in the male's prostate.

    It is the most common cancer in men >50 years of age.

    Signs and symptoms include weak urinary stream, polyuria, nocturia, hematuria, erectile dysfunction, pelvic pain, back pain, chest pain, lower extremity weakness or numbness and loss of bowel or bladder control.

    Renal Cancer

    Renal cancer is the disease in which certain tissues of the kidney starts to grow uncontrollably and form a tumor.

    It is also called as renal adenocarcinoma or hypernephroma.

    Classic triad of symptoms are flank pain, palpable abdominal mass and gross hematuria.

    Testicular Cancer

    Testicular cancer is a rare neoplasm that arises from the testis. It commonly presents as a painless testicular mass.

    It has high prevalence in young and middle-aged men in the age of 15-40 years old.

    It is a highly treatable disease with a high cure rate.

    Testicular primary germ cell tumors coming from the malignant transformation of primordial germ cells make up 95% of all testicular cancer.